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PBS NewsHour Broadcast Highlights the Rise of University-Affiliated Retirement Homes

The most recent broadcast report in PBS NewsHour’s series “Taking Care,” which focuses on the challenges of long-term care for older adults, addresses the growing prevalence of university-affiliated retirement communities.

According to the report, there are currently close to 100 retirement communities with ties to universities functioning nationwide. In the report, PBS NewsHour investigates colleges and universities that are renewing ties with alumni by developing or forming ties with retirement communities.

Stanford University, Oberlin College, Duke University, University of California Davis, University of Notre Dame, Cornell University, and the University of Texas are among the other universities and colleges that have ties with retirement communities.

Special correspondent Spencer Michaels examines Oak Hammock, a development affiliated with and located close to the University of Florida. During the report, Michaels investigates the experience of Oak Hammock’s retired residents, including Ray Goldwire and wife Ann who voice their favor in the community as it allows them to stay active, as well as attend performances, and classes with academics and PhDs held at the community itself. Residents can also attend classes on campus.

The community offers independent living for older adults, however it also provides an assisted living wing; skilled nursing and a memory unit for those with Dementia are also available.

The report acknowledges that to live at the community, prospective residents must pass financial and health tests. In addition to an entry fee for living unit prices (apartment or home), monthly fees also apply to cover 20 to 25 meals, activities, and maintenance.

Predictions suggest, the report says, that there will be explosive growth in places like Oak Hammock in the next decade or two.

Watch the report in full here

Previous broadcasts also include a report centered on innovative products for older adults currently being engineered by tech developers.

Source: PBS NewsHour